Celerity Sponsors Computer Programming Course at Local High School

DALLASTOWN, PA—To address the talent-starved tech industry and lack of access to computer science courses, Celerity has sponsored a Computer Programming course at Dallastown High School.

Computer programming was cut from the school’s curriculum five years ago, but with a grant from the York County Alliance and volunteer support from Celerity professionals, 120 high school students are now enrolled in the class for the 2014-2015 school year.

Dallastown Area High School
“We wanted to provide a hands-on look at programming, and are tailoring the class to mirror real-world environments,” says math teacher Kyle McAllister, who secured the grant and is teaching the course. “The best way to do this was to bring in professionals that can explain workplace concepts and workflows for the types of projects that a career in technology demands.”

Todd Miller, a Celerity Engagement Manager who recently received the Central Penn Business Journal’s “40 Under 40” Award for his success as a passionate IT thought leader, is acting as the workplace representative for the course. Todd guides students through lessons in software development methodologies and philosophies like Agile and Scrum, arming them with common vocabulary and skills that are used in a technical work environment. He’s also helping with discussions around the different career options for computer programmers, and is showcasing some of Celerity’s work in the Digital Experience space to provide real-world examples.

Every month, the tech industry adds about 9,600 jobs to the U.S. economy. By 2018, it will have added another 1.2 million new jobs, boasting an average salary of $78,000. And still,computer science is the only STEM field that has seen a decrease in student participation over the last 20 years.

After the first semester, McAllister hopes to present his new course model at the Pennsylvania Education Technology Expo and Conference to spread the word about his students’ success.

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